Other strategies could also make public dental services more affordable as part of a universal health care system. First, because OHT qualifications take less time to train. The Australian government may consider gradually reducing the number of students enrolled in dental programs. The reduction in the enrolment of dental students in the national territory, supported by the State, would reduce public expenditure on higher education. Second, to address an inefficient skilling relationship of the workforce, a rapid increase in the number of OHTs could be achieved by replacing dental student positions with OHT student positions. As a result, an increase in the overall supply of OHT could allow for a more affordable investment in universal dental care compared to the status quo. The main hypotheses discussed above qualitatively discuss some of the main limitations of our study. The results should therefore be interpreted with caution. France still lacks solid epidemiological data for its dental policy. Our study also found a link between dental coverage and the frequency of preventive visits to the dentist. Nearly 8 in 10 Americans (77%) with dental care at work visit the dentist one or more times a year, compared to less than half (40%) of those without coverage. Current Australian dental workforce models, which rely primarily on dentists to provide dental care, are ineffective in providing public dental services. Duckett S, Cowgill M, Swerissen H.

Filling the Void: A Universal Dental System for Australia. Melbourne: Grattan Institute; 2019. This study assessed the potential economic benefits for the use of OHT staff from the perspective of the Australian health system for dental services under the CDBS as a case study. 2012;76 (8):1054-60. Harper P, Kleinman E, Gallagher J, Knight V. Low-cost personnel planning: optimizing the dental team`s skill mix for England. J Enterp Inf Manag. . .

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