These matching rules do not apply to verbs used in the simple past tense without auxiliary verbs. Before you can start correcting errors, you need to be clear about the subject-verb match rules. In principle, the object of the clause must correspond in number with the verb of the clause; If you have a plural sub-fold, you must have a plural sub-fold. Remember: here are some constructions, look for the subject AFTER the verb and choose a singular verb (is) or plural (are) to match the subject. Here the subject is a group of three people: Sarah, Ella and Cleo. This means that it is plural and requires a plural agreement such as “are”. It`s easy to get confused because the last name on the list is singular, but the subject is really the three girls. To correct this error, pay close attention if you see a list that forms the subject of the sentence. When the words in a sentence fall between the subject and the verb, it`s easy to get confused. The distance between the subject and the verb can make you think that another word is the subject.

Here`s an example: Sometimes, however, a prepositional alhrase inserted between the subject and the verb complicates the agreement. This sentence refers to the individual efforts of each crew member. The Gregg Reference Manual provides excellent explanations of subject-verb correspondence (section 10:1001). Modern Swedish has no subject-verb correspondence in any time. Swedish uses the same present tense, the same past, the same future construction, etc., regardless of the number (singular/plural) and person (first/second/third) of the subject. The rest of this lesson deals with some more advanced subject-verb matching rules and with exceptions to the original subject-verb agreement rule like the prepositional alphabet, the clause that/the/never contains the subject. The subject of a sentence must match the verb of the sentence: 2. Pay attention to the prepositional sentences placed between the subject and the verb and immediately identify the noun in the sentence as an object of a preposition: an object of a preposition can NEVER be a subject of a sentence. . .

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